Airbags

Airbags operate in a very simple manner.
When an airbag sensor detects a collision, it automatically ignites a substance known as Sodium Azide held inside the vehicle. When this substance is ignited, it creates nitrogen gas, inflating the air bag.
This is related to the gas laws in the form of “Avagadro’s Law.” When nitrogen gas enters the bag, it essentially adds volume. The more particles, the greater the volume. Thus, the bag inflates.

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Diagram of an airbag being activated

Titrations

Titration is the use of one chemical in which you know the concentration and volume of to find the concentration and volume of another substance.

This can be applies using the M1V1=M2V2 equation, which states that the molarity and volume of one substance can be used to determine that of another.

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An example of titration using a color indicator

For example, you could use this with an antacid tablet. If you put 25mL of a solution into a flask and added a pH indicator like BTB to the tablet solution until it turned blue (indicating a base), then dripped 12mL of nitric acid of a .75 Molar concentration into it until it turned greenish (indicating the mixture was neutral), then you could find the concentration of the solution. You would need to then balanced the equation:
Mg(HCO3)2(aq) + 2HNO3(aq) –> Mg(NO3)2(aq) + 2H2O(l) + 2CO2(g). This tells the ratio is a 1:2 ratio in the solution.

First, use amount of acid: (.75mol HNO3/1L) * (.012L) = .009mol HNO3
Next use molar ratio: (.009mol HNO3) * (1mol Mg(HCO3)2/2mol HNO3) = .0045mol Mg(HCO3)2
Then, find the concentration: (.0045mol Mg(HCO3)2) ÷ (.025L) = .18 M
This tells us there are .18 moles of magnesium bicarbonate

Titration can be used for various other uses, and can often assist many industries such as water chemists and engineers, as well as chemical scientists.

3 Questions for 5/9/14

1.What tasks have you completed recently?
I have recently completed online homework for chemistry.

2.What have you learned recently?
I have learned how to determine volume, pressure, and temperature of gasses using the gas laws.

3.What are you planning on doing next?
I plan to be able to organize myself better to increase my productivity, and do well on the final exam, as well as prepare for my senior year of high school.

Exploration – Water/Pressure Lab (i.e. Gas Laws) – 5/5/14

In class, we did an exploration is which we were to determine multiple pieces of data in order to better understand the “Gas Laws.”

The Lab itself was a simple apparatus, where we were to fill a jar using a tube and funnel from 3 different heights, and determine the amount of pressure that compressed the gas in each trial.

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A simple diagram of the first two trials

Perhaps the most frustrating part of this lab, keeping air from entering the jar after it was sealed was a daunting task. By clamping the tube and by maintaining water in the funnel, we avoided excess air in the jar.

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In the end, we went back and used multiple calculations to determine the various factors. We concluded that the higher the funnel the more water that could enter the jar. Thus, this allows us to conclude that the volume of the gas at the taller height had less volume than at the lower height. This also tells us that as volume increases, pressure decreases. This is an inverse relationship in gas laws, also known as “Boyle’s Law.”

3 Questions for 5/2/14

1.What tasks have you completed recently?
I have recently completed class blogs online for chemistry.

2.What have you learned recently?
I have learned how to do redox equations.

3.What are you planning on doing next?
I plan to be able to organize myself better to increase my productivity, and do well on the EOC test, as well as prepare for my senior year of high school.

3 Questions for 4/25/14

1.What tasks have you completed recently?
I have recently completed flipped questions online for chemistry.

2.What have you learned recently?
I have learned how to install positions in an engine.

3.What are you planning on doing next?
I plan to be able to organize myself better to increase my productivity, and do well on the unit 4 test, as well as prepare for the upcoming “Alice” play by MHS Theatre this May.

Cool Reactions

For this post, we’ll be looking at the “Top Ten Chemical Reactions” from Listverse.com. Now, for those of you who do not know, not all of these are actually chemical reactions, and I’m here to explain why.
The explanations of each reaction will be listed by the number the reaction appears as on the list.

10. This is a chemical reaction. Simply put, the reaction clearly produces gas, which is a huge indicator of a chemical reaction. The reaction produces something new, thus indicating a  chemical reaction.

9. This is an obvious chemical reaction, as the magnesium is burning, a sure sign of chemical change.

8. Once again,we see here another chemical reaction. This is indicated by,you guessed it, burning and gas production.

7. This reaction is not a chemical reaction. There is no sure indicator, as temperature change occurs in both physical and chemical changes.

6. Yet again, we see here a reaction that’s” not-so-chemical.” The reason being is that A PHYSICAL CHANGE IS NOT A CHEMICAL CHANGE. This cannot be stressed enough. Through the reaction, sodium acetate remains sodium acetate in multiple forms. Something different is not produced,and therefore there is no chemical reaction.

5. Another mistake by the website, this reaction is not chemical. Obviously so, the hydrogels remain hydrogels, and the water remains water. There is no product, and no chemical change.

4. This “reaction” is pretty obvious, considering that Sulfur Hexafloride ISN’T REACTING WITH ANYTHING…. a single chemical by itself is NOT a chemical change. It is still Sulfur Hexafloride after its “reaction,” and is not in any way a chemical reaction.

3. Superfluid Helium, although cool,is not a chemical change. Reflecting back we must remember, a physical change is not a chemical change.

2. Smoke + Fire = well, a chemical reaction. In this reaction, we see the thermite’s component chemicals reacting with the liquid nitrogen, giving us our chemical reaction.

1. This reaction is chemical, and possibly a little hard to identify. Color change, often an indicator of chemical change, is the only indicator present, making it a little tough to identify. This reaction, however, is indeed chemical.

Next, we need to get out some balanced chemical equations for those reactions that were identified as chemical.

10. 2Na + Cl2 —-> 2NaCl ; This equation is a synthesis and redox reaction.

9. 2Mg + CO2 —-> 2MgO + C ; This is known as single replacement metathesis.

8. 6KClO3 + C6H12O6 —-> 6KCl + 6H2O + 6CO2 + 3O2 ; This reaction is most likely combustion, giving the reacting that occurs in experimentation and its products in the equation.

2. This equation was the best I could find, giving the variable forms of thermite. This equation uses ferric oxide and aluminum powder. Fe2O3 + 2Al —-> Al2O3 + 2Fe ; In this case, the reaction is a single replacement metathesis and redox reaction.

1. This reaction’s equation, unfortunately, was almost unidentifiable based on the chemicals and reactions. I was unable to determine this equation.

My favorite reaction probably had to be #8- The Potassium Chlorate & Red Gummy Bear reaction. Just the sheer chaos that ensues when the bear hits the chemical is, well, awesome. It also shows how chemical compositions affect reactions, because honestly, who would suspect a gummy beat could cause a reaction like that?

This Guy ^^^